Neglected Tropical Diseases

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Madam Kamazoue Abatan, food vendor. She is a beneficiary of early diagnosis and prompt treatment.
No longer ashamed Mr. Tchazimon Essohanani, 58, is a father of six…
WHO calls for robust global efforts to end transmission of leprosy infection
23 September 2016 | Geneva | New Delhi | Beijing − The World Health…
A South Sudanese boy examins a cloth filter The Carter Center
23 September 2016 | Geneva | New Delhi | Beijing − The World Health…

    Overview

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) encompass 17 bacterial, parasitic and viral diseases that occur solely, or principally in tropical regions. They are often termed ‘neglected’ as the people who are most affected are the poorest populations living in rural areas, urban slums and conflict zones.

    Disease Outbreak

    There is no Disease Outbreak data at this time

    Guidelines for stopping mass drug administration and verifying elimination of human onchocerciasis

    Human onchocerciasis (river blindness) is a disease of the skin and eye caused by Onchocerca volvulus, a parasitic worm transmitted by Simulium species (black flies) that breed in fast-flowing rivers and streams. The disease is endemic in 31 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, three countries in Latin America and in Yemen. Since 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) has verified three countries in Latin America as free of human onchocerciasis.

    Whilst nodulectomy and vector control have been implemented in the past, the current intervention strategy is based on mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin. In Africa, annual community-directed treatment with ivermectin is the main intervention in most areas except in a few foci where semi-annual treatment is implemented. In the Americas, semi-annual ivermectin treatment with a minimum coverage of 85% is the main intervention; recently, quarterly treatment has been implemented in some foci.

    Guidelines for stopping mass drug administration and verifying elimination of human onchocerciasis

    Multimedia

    ESPEN and the elimination of the lymphatic filariasis as a public health problem in Togo