Immunization and Vaccines Development

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The Immunization and Vaccines Development Programme provides technical support to countries in the African Region in order to contribute to the reduction of disease, disability and death due to vaccine preventable diseases through achieving and sustaining high immunisation coverage, eradicating poliomyelitis, eliminating neonatal tetanus, controlling yellow fever and introducing new vaccines.


1 in 5 children in Africa do not have access to life-saving vaccines It is estimated that about three million children under five years of age die each year in the African Region and a significant number of these deaths could be prevented by vaccines. Yet one in five children does not receive them. Lack of service delivery in remote areas or lack of information about the effectiveness of vaccines is a major reason many do not receive them.

“Countries and stakeholders must raise the visibility of vaccine-preventable diseases, address barriers to vaccination, and make substantial and sustained additional investments to strengthen health systems and achieve equitable access to immunization services,” said Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa.


WHO launches African Vaccination Week in Zambia
WHO launches African Vaccination Week in ZambiaBrazzaville/Lusaka, 23 April 2015 – Today, the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Africa launches the African Vaccination Week (AVW) in Lusaka, Zambia under the theme “Vaccination, a gift for life”. This event marks the commencement of week-long immunization activities from 24 to 30 April across all 47 countries in the WHO African Region.
 
Immunization is one of the most cost-effective public health interventions but many children and adults still do not have access to many life-saving vaccines. It is estimated that about three million children under the age of five years die each year in the African Region and a significant number of these deaths could be prevented by receiving immunizations.

evd-imm-30-03As a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC), the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa has drawn huge global attention and response. Numerous queries about immunization services and the risks they present have been raised. Tragically in some areas, there are reports of increased vaccine-preventable deaths, such as measles. In this context, practical guidance on immunization is needed.


Topics

Integrated child survival interventions

Measles elimination

Monitoring and evaluation

Polio eradication

 



Reach every district (RED) approach

Tetanus elimination

Vaccine research and development

Yellow fever control



 

 

Highlights

yellow fever 20130517-tn

African Vaccination Week


Save the Dates, Join the Cause!

1st Continental Ministerial Conference on Immunization
16 - 17 November 2015, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia