Control of Sexually Transmitted and Reproductive Tract Infections, and HIV/AIDS

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Each year some 340 million new cases of syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis occur in men and women aged 15-49; overall, STI prevalence rates continue to rise in most countries. The majority of HIV infections are sexually transmitted or associated with pregnancy, childbirth and breastfeeding. The interactions between sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS are now widely recognized. In addition, sexual and reproductive ill-health and HIV/AIDS share root causes, including poverty, gender inequality and social marginalization of the most vulnerable populations. The international community agrees that the Millennium development goals will not be achieved without ensuring access to SRH services and an effective global response to HIV/AIDS.

The main objective of the components is to provide guidance on strategies for controlling sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and reproductive tract infections (RTIs), including strategies to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV and other STIs and to improve strategies for the integration of RH and HIV/AIDS. The following outcomes are expected:

  • improved access to, and uptake of key HIV/AIDS and SRH services, better access of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) to SRH services tailored to their needs,
  • improved coverage of underserved and marginalized populations, such as injecting drug users, sex workers or men who have sex with men, with SRH services,
  • greater support for dual protection against unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, for those in need, especially young people,
  • improved quality of care and enhanced programme effectiveness and efficiency.

Under the WHO/UNFPA Strategic Partnership Program, the countries have been assisted in the development, and adaptation of norms and guidelines for STI's control and management.